What We Didn’t Have in 1950

1954 Admiral Television

I was 10 years old in 1954, when we bought our first television. We didn’t even buy the television to watch television. If I remember correctly my sister had a lazy eye, and prescribed a television (talk about an expensive prescription) so she would use her lazy eye more. We fixed a screen on one side that fit over half the screen, that made her use her lazy eye. If it wasn’t for her eye problem we probably wouldn’t have bought a television so soon.

The first thing I remember watching on the television was the movie Buck Privates (1941) with Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. Howdy Doody would come on at about 3:30 in the afternoon, then was followed by Pinky Lee, then usually a western movie with Bob Maynard, Kit Carson, Gene Autry and many others would come on till it was time for the Camel Caravan news program with John Cameron “It takes a licking and keeps on ticking” Swayze doing a 15 minute news program. He was later well-known for being the spokesman for Timex watches, as he demonstrated how much abuse the watches could take and keep on ticking.

We only had one channel at first, so we had no problem working the controls. It became more complicated, when cable television companies began to go into business. We then had the old wired remote controls, which later went the way of the do-do bird and gave way to remote controls with batteries. Now we could not only change the channels, but could also turn the volume up and down, adjust the picture, record programs to watch later and best of all could zap through the commercials. Sponsors of the television programs were not too hep on the idea, since you record a show, then watch it about 20 minutes later and zap through the commercials and cut an hour-long show into about 40 minutes minus the commercials. After the show we would wonder who was sponsoring the show.

We got along fine without cell phones, since there was no such thing in 1950. I only had a cell phone when I needed one for working as a caregiver, since I had to call the office all night, so they knew I wasn’t dozing off at work. I haven’t had a cell phone since 2011, since I never did learn to text on the contraptions.

We didn’t Google it in 1950. We would just go to the library and would usually find the information there. It would be 48 years later, before we could Google it and find information in seconds, that used to involve riding to library and digging through index cards, or going through the reference books section to find the same information, that we can find in seconds today.

I don’t remember having a microwave oven, while growing up so got along well without one. I did find out later, that after buying one years later, that it was easy to ruin popcorn, by cooking it too long. Now I never cook it as long as recommended, to prevent having to throw out charcoal popcorn. My favorite use for microwave ovens is to melt ice cream in it. I am not a fan of ice cream right out of the freezer, so would put it in microwave and leave it on for about 2 hours….just kidding….about 35 seconds later the ice cream would be good and creamy but still cold.

It was about 1966 or 1967 when we got our first air conditioner. I was about 21 at the time and had just came back from Vietnam, and was thinking it would have been nice to have an air conditioner over there. I didn’t know how to act with an air conditioner, since I had lived 21 years without one, so it took awhile to get used to putting on a jacket when the air conditioner was running. I didn’t have to worry about putting on a jacket from 1992 to 1998, since I was in bankruptcy and had to choose between eating and staying cool and eating won out. I bought a 10 inch box fan and had it blowing on my face, and I was able to sleep at night with no problem during those six years. I couldn’t wait to get to work at Town Talk, since air conditioning usually worked there.

I remember when we were growing up that we bought ice in blocks and put the blocks in the refrigerator. About 60 years later we bought our first icemaker, since my wife liked to have crushed ice. It was nice having crushed ice, till the icemaker went on the blink. Best of all it saved paying $2 or more for a bag of crushed ice.

The only personal computer we owned back in 1950 was our brain that computed what we learned in school, and solved math problems before Common Core made it all complicated. My mother bought us our first computer, a Commodore 64 which was very rudimentary compared to the computers of today. It was mostly a machine to play games on, and we sometimes would type the code for games out of magazines published for Commodore 64 users. Later on we bought more advanced computers, but they were still too complicated for me. It took me a year to figure out how to send emails. I have never been a computer whiz. I know how to do the basics like copy and paste, but don’t ask me how to hook up a router or modem, or the computer may cease to function.

Before we bought our television in 1954 the only entertainment we had been listening to was old-time radio shows on our table radio, and playing records on our phonograph player. Then cassettes became popular, but were a real headache if the tape got tangled up inside the tape player. 8 track players were also around about this time, but I completely missed the boat on 8 track players, since I never owned a 8 track player or a 8 track tape.

The compact disc became the most popular way to listen to music, since the CD players let you pick a certain track if you wanted to play it, unlike cassette players where you had to more or less play the whole tape to hear a song from the starting point.

It was 2004 when I bought my first MP3 player and I was surprised to learn that you could carry thousands of songs, in one device and the Creative Nomad Zen Xtra Jukebox (pictured above) was my first MP3 player. It was 40 GB and I had 3,000 songs on it the last time I checked. You could go directly to any of the 3,000 songs in a matter of seconds.

One of my favorite uses for the MP3 player was to listen to old-time radio shows from the 20’s, 30’s, 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. I found out I could buy 800 Jack Benny shows for $12 on a MP3 CD. Sam’s at about that time was selling about 10 shows for $20, so I bought the MP3 CD’s exclusively from old-time radio retailers and ebay sellers and it was possible to build up my collection fast. I currently own 17,000 episodes of many old-time radio shows of all genres. Best thing all 17,000 episodes fit inside one binder manufactured for CD’s.

All I had to do was place the MP3 CD’s into the computer and copy the files into the computer, then transfer them from computer to the MP3 player, and it works the same way with regular music CD’s.

Whoever invented the GPS probably had me in mind, since I hated folding and unfolding paper maps, to find out if I was going the right direction, to arrive at my destination. I don’t know how many times I had taken wrong roads, before the GPS was invented. It still is scary when the GPS tells you that you have arrived at your destination, when you are in the middle of nowhere with no houses in sight.

It is amazing to me that this lady telling me directions is flying around up in space, with nothing better to do, than to keep an eye on my vehicle, and if I miss a turn she is nice enough to say recalculating and letting me know we will still arrive even if it is a 20 mile detour to get to the destination.

One of the handiest inventions is the automated teller machine, that gives people money at all hours of the day and night. It used to be if they locked up the bank on Saturday afternoon, then the customer would have to wait till Monday morning to make a transaction. Now they can drain their bank accounts down to nothing in just minutes, instead of draining it a little bit at a time, while waiting in line at the bank.

Sometimes criminals have to call for assistance even with automated banking, if the bank card they stole won’t work, or even worse the automated teller machine takes the card and won’t return it to the bank card thief. The bank will send someone to the bank and tell them the pin number for the card and apologize for the inconvenience.

My mom was very slow when using the automated tellers, and more than once someone would walk in the building housing the ATM machine and get aggravated about the long wait, then finally go back to their car, drive off with wheels squealing in search of a ATM machine with someone faster using the machine.

Sometimes I wonder how we got by back in 1950 with no television, no cell phone, no Google, no icemaker, no GPS, no MP3 player, no ATM machine, no personal computer and no microwave oven. We managed to get by without all of these inventions, because most of them hadn’t been invented in 1950.

Five Innocent People Convicted of Murder

Eric Glisson released after 17 years in prison for crime he didn’t commit.

We all have heard prisoners say they didn’t do the crime, that they are imprisoned for, but in the case of Eric Glisson he was telling the truth. It took 17 years before his innocence was proved, but he is a free man today after being imprisoned in Sing Sing Prison.

A livery cab driver Baithe Diop had been killed on August 19,1995, and a few weeks later a lady Miriam Tavares told the police she knew who did it. She claimed to have seen the crime from her bathroom window. Then she proceeded to name the killers, and claimed to hear their conversation, even though her bathroom window was 100 yards from the crime scene.

Sister Joanna Chan who helped Glisson procure a lawyer to prove his innocence.

Glisson and three men and a woman were sent to prison for the crime. Glisson exhausted his appeals eleven years later in 2006. Sister Joanna Chan, a Catholic nun was doing volunteer work at Sing Sing, and took an interest in Glisson’s case. She contacted Peter Cross, who was a corporate lawyer and told him about Glisson’s case. Cross took the case, even though he was not a criminal lawyer, and agreed to not charge Glisson.

Attorney Peter Cross and Eric Glisson

Cross went to the bathroom window, that the lady claimed to have seen the crime from, and there was no way she could have seen the crime scene from that window, since it was not in the line of sight. The detectives working the case had never taken the trouble, to see what they could see from that window.

Glisson mentioned on the Dateline broadcast, that this particular lady didn’t like him, so that is probably why his name was mentioned by her to the detectives. She died of a drug overdose in 2002, so she couldn’t be re-questioned about the murder.

2012 would bring Glisson the documents he had been requesting for years, due to the Freedom of Information Act. He received cell phone records which showed, that Jose Rodriguez and Jose Vega of the Bronx Sex, Money, Murder gang had placed phone calls from the cab driver’s cell phone minutes after the murder.

Then Glisson wrote a letter to the U.S. Attorney telling him he had information that proved, that he had not killed the cab driver. John O’Malley who had known that Rodriguez and Vega had confessed to the murder of the cab driver 10 years earlier traveled to Sing Sing to talk personally to Glisson.

After getting the letter, O’Malley went to Sing Sing and told Glisson he knew who really killed the Diop.

“Immediately John O’Malley just stood up and he asked me, ‘Did you write this letter?’ And I said, ‘Yes,’” Glisson told Dateline. “He shook my hand. And he said, ‘I– I’m sorry.’ And I said, ‘Sorry for what?’ He says, you know, ‘I know you’re innocent.’“

“When he said that, I said, ‘You — what are you talkin’ about, sir?’ He said, ‘Listen, I know the guys who committed this crime.’

He asked Glisson if he was the one who wrote the letter, then when Glisson said yes he told Glisson, that he was innocent, and that he knew who had committed the murders. O’Malley signed an affidavit stating that Glisson was innocent.

The wheels of justice still turned slow and it was four months before the prosecutors agreed, to request the judge to set Glisson and Cathy Watkins free. Glisson was 18 when sent to prison and his daughter was a week old. Glisson was 37 when released from prison. The rest of the five prisoners wrongly arrested and imprisoned had their convictions overturned, in January of 2013 ending a nightmare for the five, who spent so many years in prison for a crime they didn’t commit.

Glisson returned to college and received his degree, then opened a fresh juice store named Fresh Take, which was derived from him having a fresh take on life, after being released from prison.

His story makes me wonder how many prisoners were wrongly convicted of murder, and are resigned to dying in prison. The prison system probably have a lot of Eric Glissons in prison, that are hoping that someone like Sister Joanna Chan takes an interest in their case, and contacts a lawyer that can help prove the prisoner is innocent.

Pharmacist Robert Courtney: Got Rich While Cancer Patients Suffered and Died

Robert Courtney At Work

Pharmacist Robert Courtney diluted chemotherapy drugs.

Many criminals have been featured on American Greed, since the first show was telecast in 2007, but pharmacist Robert Courtney took greed to a whole new level.

Courtney diluted chemotherapy drugs, so he could make even more money, by selling them to doctors in watered down form. The American Greed narrator last night said that Courtney would buy chemotherapy drugs in powder form, for $500 for the medicine,  and would then sell the drugs to doctors for $1,000. However, by diluting the drugs he was able to sell the doctors three diluted preparations for $3,000, which gave him a profit of $2,500, after he had originally spent $500 to buy the drugs.

The cancer patients were wondering why they weren’t having many side effects, from their chemotherapy medicine. It was because they were only receiving a third or even less, of their chemotherapy medicine. One man who didn’t experience the normal hair loss, after his chemotherapy sessions later would find out, that his cancer was spreading, to other parts of his body, because he hadn’t been given enough chemotherapy medicine.

Georgia Hayes, who was a victim of the watered down chemotherapy medicine sued Robert Courtney, because of his unethical behavior. She received a $2.2 billion judgement, but it is unlikely, that she actually received any money. However, she evidently never saw any money from the judgement. Her daughter appeared at the trial and said she wanted her mom to be there, when she graduated and was married, but her mom died before any of that happened.

Courtney was active in the Assembly of God Church in Kansas City and was a deacon and sang in the choir.

The diluted drugs were making Courtney a rich man and he had assets of $18.7 million. Investigators asked him why he did it, and he said he had promised the church $1 million, for a building project, but that made no sense, since he had 18 times that amount in his assets at the time.

These are the horrifying statistics from his criminal activity:

98,000 diluted prescriptions

4,200 patients

72 different drugs were diluted

Courtney pled guilty to 20 counts of tampering and adulterating chemical therapy drugs.He was sentenced to 30 years in 2002 and will be released in 2032 at the age of 80 years old.

The sentence didn’t fit the crime, since no telling how many patients died, who were given less than the required amount of chemotherapy medicine.

There was very little remorse coming from Courtney, except when he mentioned one patient by name saying that was the only one, that really hurt him, since the guy was a nice guy.

Courtney was so absorbed in building his bank account, that he forgot or didn’t care about the patients, that were taking longer to recover from their chemotherapy, because he had diluted their drugs.

The FBI agents who investigated the criminal activity of Courtney were sometimes moved to tears, after talking to patients, who thought they were getting the required amount of chemotherapy medicine in their IV bags.

He should have been sentenced to life, since so many of the patients he affected died because of his negligence.

American Greed features criminals mostly who took the money of investors, but Courtney wasn’t taking the money of investors, but was risking the health of cancer patients, who had pinned their hopes of recovery, on their chemotherapy medicine, for his own financial gain.

Bernard Ebbers: Billionaire to Prison Inmate

Bernard Ebbers in prison till the age of 87 at the least.

Bernard “Bernie” Ebbers was the first Bernie, to be imprisoned for investor fraud. Ebbers first formed LDDS, which was a discount telephone company in 1993. Two years later he changed the name of the company, to WorldCom in 1995. By then WorldCom owned 60 telecommunications companies, and in 1997 would merge with MCI for $37 billion.

Ebbers was born Bernard John Ebbers in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada on August 27, 1941 and is now 73 years old.

He operated a chain of motels in Mississippi and was known to have cleaned rooms himself, to save on housekeeping expenses.

The ultimate corporate shopaholic, Ebbers bought an obscure telephone carrier in the 1980s and went on a 17-year acquisition binge that turned it into the world’s largest telecom company. Alas, his passion for deal­making didn’t translate into the savvy necessary for running the complex business. When telecom stocks went south in 2000, the company’s massive debt was exposed. Ebbers tried to disguise it through fraudulent accounting. In 2005, three years after WorldCom filed for bankruptcy, he was convicted of overseeing $11 billion worth of accounting fraud. He’s now serving a 25-year prison term.

THE STAT: When Ebbers resigned, in 2002, WorldCom stock had fallen to $1.79 from a peak of $64.50 in 1999. (from CNBC.com)

The WorldCom debacle hit me personally, since I had an Army friend lose his job, because of the WorldCom collapse, since he worked for WorldCom. It devastated him and I don’t know if he will ever recover, from the loss of his job.

At one point Ebbers was earning $37 million a year, between his salary and other financial considerations. However, that didn’t stop him from ending free coffee for WorldCom workers, as coffee machines that charged 35 cents a cup took the place of the free coffee.

Home for Bernie Ebbers through 2028

Ebbers resigned from WorldCom on April 30,2002. He was later convicted of conspiracy, securities fraud, and false regulatory findings in 2005. He wouldn’t be sentenced till 2006, after the appeals process had been exhausted. He drove himself, to the Oakdale, Louisiana Federal Prison and reported for his incarceration.

This is what a typical day in prison is like for Ebbers:

A typical day would start at 6 a.m. with work starting 1 and a half hours later.

Work usually ends at 3:35 p.m.

At 4 p.m. comes “count time” when each inmate, unless he is assigned to the food service area, must be by their bunk, Truman said.

Mail call follows count time which is then followed by dinner, served in staggered shifts.

After that, inmates can typically walk in the recreation yard around the track or go to the chapel or the library, Truman said.

Depending on the institution, the day most likely finishes around 9 p.m. when inmates are required to be back in their bunks with lights out.

Ebbers will be required to wear a khaki uniform. An on-facility commissary allows inmates to buy personal items such as soap, toothpaste, or toothbrushes.

From money/cnn.com

Ebbers was convicted by a jury in March 2005 of nine counts of conspiracy, securities fraud and other crimes that led to the phone company’s July 2002 bankruptcy.

Ebbers transformed WorldCom into a telecommunications powerhouse through a string of takeovers. He was known as a grandfatherly CEO who preferred cowboy boots to suits, but he also has been described as an exacting, cost-obsessed boss.

WorldCom emerged from bankruptcy as MCI Inc., which was later acquired by Verizon Communications Inc (up $0.46 to $37.96, Charts). Ebbers agreed last year to forfeit almost all of his personal wealth in a settlement with WorldCom investors.

Mail can be sent to Ebbers at this address, which may not be the correct address after 2028. Former Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards was housed, in the same facility until his release.

INMATE NAME & REGISTER NUMBER
FCI OAKDALE
FEDERAL CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION
P.O. BOX 5000
OAKDALE, LA  71463

American Greed: Television Documentary Series That Details How Greed Leads to Prison

American Greed is a television documentary series, that details how unscrupulous criminals deceive investors, into investing millions of dollars. Only problem is that the money invested almost always goes into the bank account, of the criminals whose only investment is in their lifestyle.

The series will be showing previously unaired shows starting Thursday at 10 PM ET on the CNBC Network. Previously aired shows can be found at the CNBC listings at your cable or satellite provider, and can be found, at various hours during the week, with most shows being shown after market hours. It is easy to catch up on shows that may have been missed, by searching for them and recording them as you find them for later viewing. Full episodes can also be seen at CNBC.com.

The show is aptly named, since the show centers on criminals, that offer ridiculously high interest rates, in return for an investor investing thousands or millions of dollars. Ponzi schemes continue to flourish, despite the demise of ruthless criminals like Bernie Madoff and Allen Stanford, whose Ponzi schemes ended, with Madoff receiving a 150 year prison sentence, with a 2159 release date, when he would be 220 years old, and Stanford received a 110 year sentence, that would make him 171, upon his release in 2122.

Many of the criminals profiled in the shows were successful businessmen already, but succumbed to the urge to make even more money, even if it meant crossing the line, into criminal activity that could lead to prison if exposed. It all goes back to the age old question, of how much money is enough. It is usually never enough, for a businessman, that wants to live a lavish lifestyle.

The Bob McLean profile on American Greed is a prime example, of a man who went too far, to amass a huge fortune. McLean hob-nobbed with the most influential politicians, while donating money to charities, which included the Country Music Hall of Fame. The episode tells about McLean showing how he kept track of the stock market, by having a ticker in his office. It was later revealed, that he didn’t invest a penny for a five and-a-half year period.

McLean made a sizable donation to Middle Tennessee State University, for a medical school which was named in his honor. However, his name was removed from the building, when it was revealed that he was a crook, that cared only about himself.

His close friend Ray Vanatta was one of the investors bilked out of millions of dollars. These paragraphs from a New York Times article tell about the financial devastation experienced by Vanatta:

Last spring, the scheme began to collapse. Ron Vannatta, who had been in the same fraternity as Mr. McLean and invested $8.5 million, was among the first to realize something was amiss. Mr. Vannatta said he had asked Mr. McLean to send him more than $350,000 to pay his 2006 taxes. But April 15 passed, and no check arrived. Other investors said they, too, stopped getting checks.

Mr. Vannatta and other investors sued, forcing Mr. McLean into involuntary bankruptcy. Three federal agencies raided his offices here.

When accountants pored over Mr. McLean’s books, they found no investments, just a paper trail showing his juggling some $20 million among investors and spending millions more on houses, cars and charitable contributions — even underwriting an independent movie.

“He got away with it for years,” Mr. Vannatta said. “He simply did not have enough new fish putting money in to pay the old fish.”

That same scenario has spelled the end for many Ponzi schemers, who see their world come crashing down. Ponzi schemes will work only as long, as the original investors keep getting their money, while newer investors may or may not get checks from the likes of McLean.

Ponzi schemes would be more successful, if the criminals would not spend money so fast. Instead they spend the money on themselves, then have nothing to pay the investors. Then the evasion tactics start, which include the bank had a problem, so that is why a check wasn’t paid on time.

There were only losers when Bob McLean committed suicide, in September of 2007, in a church parking lot in Shelbyville, Tennessee.

9/11 Survivors Not Exempt From Financial Ruin

This American Greed special show tells about how 9/11 survivors were victims of financial scams:

3 “9/11 Fraud” September 7, 2011
When Jamie Amoroso’s husband, a Port Authority officer, is killed on 9/11 her life is drastically changed. A trusted family friend and broker uses her friendship to create a joint account without Amoroso’s knowledge and forges her signature on wire transfers, stealing more than $248,000 from this young widow. Pennsylvania contractor, Thomas Cousar, defrauds the U.S. government by overcharging $800,000 for work done by his company in rebuilding the Pentagon after the attacks. Conman Patric Henn lies about a life partner lost in the twin towers and receives $68,000 from the American Red Cross. His efforts to collect additional money are thwarted when agencies cannot find any record of his partner’s death or even existence.

This is a complete list of American Greed shows from 2007-2014 and gives a much better range of get rich schemes, that usually mean someone is getting bilked out of their money. One particularly sad episode was when elderly people lost their houses, because of financial wrongdoing.

Anyone with a lot of money to invest should watch this show, before investing a cent, so they will know how wide of a range of crooks there are out there, who only care about themselves and will break laws to get that money.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_American_Greed_episodes

LBJ: JFK Assassination Kept Him Out of Prison

Bobby Baker and President Lyndon Johnson

If President John F. Kennedy hadn’t been assassinated on November 22, 1963, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson would have almost certainly been removed from office.

Vice President Johnson was having problems buying life insurance, after a 1955 heart attack. Bobby Baker contacted Don Reynolds, who sold the insurance to LBJ. I thought Reynolds was doing LBJ a favor, but LBJ requested some kickbacks from Reynolds.

Stone writes that Lyndon B. Johnson instructed Richard Nixon to hire Ruby onto the House of Representatives payroll in 1947

President Lyndon Baines Johnson: Most to Gain From JFK Assassination

This is some background of why Vice President Johnson was so concerned, about what was going on, in Washington on November 22, 1963. Whether LBJ knew about the assassination in advance may never be known, but if the whole story had been revealed to media and to the public surrounding the kickbacks LBJ was receiving LBJ almost surely would have been sent to prison.

On the afternoon of Nov. 22, 1963, Don Reynolds, the Maryland broker who had written the life insurance policy for Johnson, was telling investigators for the Senate Rules Committee that he had been pressured to buy advertising time on an Austin television station owned by Johnsoneven though the insurance salesman was unknown in Texas and could hardly expect to generate business there.
“And on November 22 … after lunch, in the Senate Rules Committee investigation [of] Bobby Baker, Don Reynolds was going to really spill his guts. But when President Kennedy was killed, it basically killed the Baker investigation. You know, President Johnson acted like he did not know me. … I think the Reynolds testimony plus the absolute hatred of Bobby Kennedy of Johnson [would have forced LBJ off the 1964 Democratic ticket if Kennedy had lived]. Poor old Walter [Jenkins, one of Johnson’s most trusted aides, who had worked with Reynolds to buy the advertising time on the Johnson station], had President Kennedy not been killed, he either would have had to take the Fifth Amendment and quit, or tell the truth and Vice President Johnson would have definitely been off the ticket in 1964, had it [been] shown that he had really been the party in the back of this.”

The Spartacus Educational website goes into more detail about the background, of Don Reynolds and the kickbacks he paid to LBJ. Reynolds sent a Magnavox stereo costing $585, when including setup and delivery. Reynold was also told to purchase $1,208 of advertising from a television station, in Austin Texas that was owned by Lady Bird Johnson.

President John F. Kennedy shown with Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson on day of assassination.

Can’t help but wonder if Vice President Johnson knew in advance, that President John F. Kennedy would be dead before the day was over. There is only circumstantial proof, that LBJ knew exactly what was going to happen and when. There still has not been smoking gun evidence, that reveals that LBJ was behind the assassination of JFK.

There is plenty of circumstantial evidence and motives to be the mastermind of the assassination:

Had most to gain by the assassination, by becoming president and no longer being in the background, while President Kennedy and his brother Bobby Kennedy kept LBJ, out of the loop as much as possible.

Reportedly had a meeting with Texas oilmen, underworld figures and Richard Nixon the night before the assassination.

Told his mistress Madeleine Duncan Brown that night: “Those SOB’s will never embarrass me again”.

LBJ had motorcade routed through Dealey Plaza.

Don Reynolds was testifying before the Senate Rules committee and was being questioned about kickbacks, at the time JFK was being assassinated in Dallas.

Life magazine was going to release information about the illegal activities of LBJ.

Fingerprints of LBJ’s hitman Mac Wallace found on sixth floor of Texas Schoolbook Depository Building. ( I still believe Oswald was in the sixth floor window, so witnesses would think he was the one firing the shots.)

The only way LBJ would be safe from his name being mentioned in the Senate Rules committee testimony was to become president on November 22, 1963.

JFK Assassination Smoking Gun

Next week will be the 51st anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. You would think, that 51 years later there would have been a smoking gun, that would have proved there was a conspiracy to assassinate JFK.

All I know is that LBJ had the motive to have JFK assassinated, since he became president immediately. He was able to stop the Senate Rules committee investigation, for the most part and prevented his name, from being mentioned in the testimony.

I am not going to say that LBJ had JFK assassinated, but I think he surely had knowledge of it. It was a matter of him using the power, of the presidency to cover it up.

It was no coincidence, that so many witnesses that saw the assassination or had knowledge of who was involved suddenly died.

It is looking like the only way we will ever know more about the assassination, than we do now is when evidence that has been locked up for 51 years is released to the media and the general public.

There is no doubt, that if JFK had not been assassinated, that LBJ would have had to serve time for receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars, in kickbacks during his time in office.

It is no coincidence that LBJ and JFK were the richest presidents, since Teddy Roosevelt ended his presidency in 2009.

Other Articles Related To Assassination:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2012/04/02/the-transition

http://www.jfklancer.com/pdf/LBJ-Reynolds.pdf

http://spartacus-educational.com/JFKreynoldsD.htm

http://jfkfacts.org/assassination/poll/why-roger-stones-jfk-book-cant-be-dismissed/

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/jfk50/reflect/20131123-swift-merciless-transition-elevated-lyndon-johnson-of-texas-to-the-presidency.ece

38 Years in Newspaper Production: Last 28 Years At Alexandria Town Talk

Page being built using cold type composition.

When I returned to Alexandria Town Talk, after working for Monroe Morning World for two years it was back to cold type composition again. I negotiated a raise to $190 a week, when I returned, which amounted to a little over $4 an hour. Ten years of experience and making $4 an hour was not exactly making me rich.

This paragraph from Farm Collector tells more about the cold type composition Town Talk had been using since 1972:

Beginning in the 1960s, hot type began to give way to cold type, which is technically neither cold nor type, but rather phototypesetting. Machines generate text printed on photographic paper. Every piece of text is then run through a machine that applies hot wax to one side (wax allows items to be repositioned multiple times), hand-trimmed and positioned on a page-size template.

Once a page layout is complete, a film negative of the page is created. That negative is used to expose the image of the page onto an aluminum plate, and the plates are applied to a printing cylinder on the press.

It was tedious work to place the ads on a page and then wrap the type and photos around the ads, since we had to cut the type to fit the page, according to the page layout. Sometimes a page would be built and an ad, for example which was 3 columns by 8 inches might actually be 4 columns by 10 inches. We then would have to re-do the page moving type and/or photos to make the ad fit the page. This was not easy to do working with paper, since we had to use an X-acto or razor blade, to cut the type where needed to fit the page.

Town Talk Starts Morning Paper

The Town Talk ended their afternoon paper and started a mornings only paper in 1981. The Town Talk missed by 2 years of having an afternoon paper for 100 years.

Some employees left the paper, when the morning paper was announced, since the composing room work was mostly done in the evenings.

The night work was tough on families, in which both spouses worked, especially if one worked days and the other nights.

 

Historic marker telling of history of Alexandria Daily Town Talk

 

Since we worked in the composing room building up pages we had a lot of interaction with editors, wire desk and sports desk employees.

Adras Laborde was the editor when I started working there and sometimes I had to take proofs of his column for him to read and check for errors.

Wallace Anthony was a longtime wire desk employee, that died four years ago. He might not have been the fastest at designing pages, but he was a perfectionist intent on producing an excellent front page.

Bill Carter was an excellent sports editor, who I enjoyed talking to in coffee shop many times about baseball.

Nelder Dawson was the first person I talked to, when applying for work at Town Talk and he was there for 50 years.

Helen Derr was the religious editor and often worked with her making any necessary changes to her Saturday church page.

Ron Grant was another editor and former photographer, who checked page proofs and was always willing to help, with any problems having to do with an editorial page.

Ethel Holloman was very particular about how her society pages looked. This was back in the day when society editor would attend weddings. She is even more famous for her investigative reporting about mistreatment of mental patients at Central Louisiana State Hospital. It would be interesting to check the Town Talk archives, so I could read her articles about the abuse of mental patients.

Jim Butler left the Town Talk way too soon, since he was an excellent editor, who was great to work with and enjoyed our conversations about baseball over the years.

Elizabeth Roberts Martin – She made the news herself when writing a review, of the Elvis Presley concert in March of 1977, which was less than 5 months before his untimely death.

 

 

This is the review reprinted by elvisconcerts.com:

 

 

CONCERT DATE: March 29 1977 (8:30 pm). Alexandria LA..

Elvis Concert Termed “Entertaining”
by Elizabeth Roberts
Alexandria Town Talk
March 30, 1977

There’s a show on stage at the Rapides Parish Coliseum that is staged very professionally – that’s with a capital “P” as in Presley. And it’s Entertaining – that’s with a capital “E” as in Elvis. But it’s not a grade A performance, I’ll grade it a B minus, but as I said, it’s entertaining.

There’s no need to rush and push tonight and there’s not a chance of seeing Presley other than on stage. He won’t begin singing until about 10PM (his plane doesn’t arrive until at least 8.30 tonight) and when he does here, he’ll be driven inside the coliseum so there’s no need to stand outside. Once you’re in your seat, you stay there. No rushing the aisles for picture-taking or for a closer look. The guards see to that.

Tuesday night Presley was on stage less than an hour; he was impossible to understand when (or if) he talked between numbers; his How Great Thou Art should have been How Loud Thou Art; he never said one word to the audience or mentioned how nice or not nice it was to be in Alexandria or said “hi, how are you, we’re going to have a good time tonight and hope you enjoy the show.” He came on stage, did a few numbers and then dashed off – no encores, no extra bows, no nothing.

He relied heavily on his back-up group and when one of the singers dropped a microphone after singing O Sole Mio, he made the guy sing it again. There were false starts on a number of songs and his repertoire was mostly 1950’s early-EP songs.

Yes, that’s how he got his start and those are the songs we screamed over years ago, but times have changed and so has Elvis. He’s not the skinny young man from Memphis by way of Tupelo and the Louisiana Hayride. He’s a good singer and a showman but neither talent showed up in Tuesday night’s show.

He should update his performance and add more contemporary numbers. He’s certainly capable – his version of Early Morning Rain was outstanding. The rest was pure early Presley: Jailhouse Rock, Blue Suede Shoes, I Got a Woman, C.C.Rider, It’s Now Or Never.

In between, a lackey followed him around, draping scarves around his neck, so Elvis could toss them to admiring fans. I’ll give The Man credit for consideration, though. He did remember there were hundreds of people sitting behind him and tossed a few scarves in their direction and did a couple of bumps and grinds. Of course, that set off the screaming masses who saw for the first time a bump and grind from the rear.

If you’re going to the show tonight and going only to see Elvis, there’s no rush. The “warm-up” program begins in the vicinity of 8.30PM. Tuesday, it ended at 9.27 for an intermission while we prepare the stage don’t forget the souvenir concessions outside.” At 9.57PM, the “Hot Hilton Horns” began playing the theme from “2001: A Space Odyssey” and the thousands of flashbulbs started exploding like strobe lights.

Then The Man appeared, dressed in gold-embroidered white jeans and jacket and a gigantic belt which he had to keep hitching up. Around his neck were two necklaces (a short neck chain and a gold coin on a gold chain) and on his left hand, a gigantic diamond ring.

There were the usual warm-up groups. Gospel singers in yellow-trimmed-in-black liesure tuxedos; the Jokers: an inspirational” comedian dressed in a denim jumpsuit embroidered with Walt Disney characters (On Gay Liberation: “If God had meant people to be that way, he would have created Adam and Freddie”); and a trio “The Sweet Inspirations” who were worth the admission price.

If you’re a people watcher, the concert is great fun. If you’re an Elvis fan, you might be disappointed. There’s more (and better) music on any record album of his you have.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Courtesy of Scott Hayward

A few more of the people who I have worked with over the years:

Richard Sharkey was known for checking and double-checking pages, before they went to the press. Then after the press started he would check the first papers rolling off the press and have us fix any mistakes made.

Cecil Williams was another editor in editorial department, who was fun to talk to.

Al Nassif was not only a sportswriter and later a wire desk employee, but also published Church Today on the side. Al was one of the nicest people ever to work for Town Talk, and employed me as a page builder for the Church Today for 13 years. It is amazing he could work two jobs and have dialysis treatments for many years.

Bob Tompkins  worked at both the Town Talk and the Monroe Morning World like me. It was good to see someone I knew from Town Talk working there in Monroe.

John Marcase will always be remembered, for his hard work on the high school football section every year and those horrific Friday nights, during high school football season, when he would make order out of chaos.

Melinda Martinez in the Focus department knew it was trouble when I visited the department. Either there was an error on the page or an ad had come up the wrong size, which caused her to have to rebuild a page, which was not exactly a picnic for her.

Mike Branigan was the composing room superintendent and was a problem solver of the first magnitude. I don’t know how many times we had to call him at home, with some major problem and a few minutes later he would be in the Town Talk composing room fixing the problem.

 Note: I know I am leaving someone out, but there are too many co-workers over the 36 years at the Town Talk, to mention them all in one article.

Moved To Camera Shop

Will never forget 1993, since that is year I was moved from page makeup to the camera shop. It was a challenge for a non-mechanical person like me and it took a long time to get used to it. Had no idea how hard it was to register photos using register marks and toning photos didn’t come easy for me. We had to register cyan, magenta, yellow and black negatives and if they weren’t registered properly it would make for a very fuzzy looking photo in the newspaper.

I don’t think the other camera shop workers liked me being in the camera shop, since I was clearly a novice that was not mechanically inclined. Changing the rolls of film in the dark for the full-page negative camera was always an adventure for me.

Paginating Classified Pages

I was eventually trained to build the classified pages using page pagination. I would first place the ads in the page using the computer, according to the classified layout, then after all the ads were in place would flow all the other classified type consisting of automobiles for sale, garage sales, etc. After the pages finished filling would place the legal type in the pages. Sometimes, we had more classified type and classified ads, than would fit in the section, so would have to make adjustments to make it work out.

Double truck ads like we did while in platemaking.

The hardest thing in the 38 years was building double truck ads, or as we called them double trouble. Cutting the middle out of the two page ads and then matching, without overlapping the two sides was very time-consuming. Black and white ads were bad enough, since they only had one negative, but the color ads took much longer, since we had to perfectly match up all four color negatives. There must be a way to do these same ads by now with computer.

Plate Made With a Platemaking Machine

Moved to Platemaking

Not sure what year it was, but was moved to platemaking and started working across the street adjacent to the pressroom.

Full page negatives would arrive in platemaking, then we would place them over a metal plate in a plate burner, which would make an impression of the page on the plate. Then we would carry the finished plates to pressroom and they would be placed on the press.

This was very hectic work and we would take most of the night, to get caught up the first time.

It was during this time, that I experienced high blood pressure problems. I went to VA hospital in Pineville and found out my blood pressure was 232/108 and nurse told me I was on the verge of a stroke.

Retired On Halloween Night

My last night of work was on Halloween night of 2004. I didn’t want to retire, but was in a position, where I really had no choice but retire.

Leaving work for the last time knowing I was ending 36 years with Town Talk, and 38 years in newspaper production was not easy. The 21-year-old kid that walked in the Town Talk in August of 1966 was now 60 years old and only two years from being on Social Security.

I will be 70 next week, but still think of Town Talk often. In fact I dream about working on the paper and trying to meet the deadline, then wake up and realize that part of my life is over.

Thanks for the memories to all of those I worked with those 38 years in newspaper production.

Sad Aftermath

The Alexandria Town Talk as I knew it longer exists.

One of the more troubling changes is that the pages aren’t even designed in Alexandria, but rather 857 miles away in Des Moines, Iowa.

Guess the editorial department is relegated writing stories and taking photos, except I guess the editors of different departments still decide, which stories will be used in the paper.  The Town Talk is more of a news gathering company and ad selling company, since the pages are designed in Des Moines, Iowa, the paper is printed in Lafayette, Louisiana and last I knew the circulation department is in North Carolina. I have heard that subscribers have to call North Carolina, if their paper isn’t delivered.

So much for Gannett being a boon to the Central Louisiana economy. They are more concerned about the bottom line, than about the local economy.

The pressroom across the street from the main building lies dormant and the Town Talk is now being printed 88 miles away in Lafayette, Louisiana. I don’t think I will ever understand, why the papers have to be delivered back to Alexandria.

The bulletin board with photos of all the employees is no longer filled and not even sure if it is still there. If it is still there doubt there is more than two rows of photos.

The composing room which once had about 40 employees doesn’t even exist, because of technology advances.

The saddest thing about the downsizing is that many of my co-workers have been let go by Gannett over the years.

The beginning of the end was when the Smith family sold the Town Talk, to Central Newspapers for $62 million in 1996.

Then four years later Gannett buys Central Newspapers as the Town Talk had three different owners from 1996-2000.

Town Talk employees had received a $150 Christmas bonus for many years, but Gannett ended that tradition almost immediately upon taking ownership.

Nationwideadvertising.com lists the Town Talk circulation in a year, which is not shown:

Advertise in the Alexandria-Pineville Louisiana “The Town Talk” Daily Newspaper. Printed mornings. Circulation: 34,437; Sunday: 39,585. 

Wikipedia now list the following circulation for the Town Talk:

The daily newspaper has a circulation of some 19,500 daily and 27,500 on Sundays.

I am hoping that there will always be an Alexandria Town Talk paper edition, since reading news on the internet can never match unfolding a paper, to read the latest news and sports.

I don’t know what the future holds for the Alexandria Town Talk, but for the sake of the present employees I hope  it is a long one.