Gasoline Cost 18 Cents a Gallon in 1950’s

With the average price of a gallon of gasoline close to $4.00, it is good to remember the good old days  when gas was 18 cents in the 1950’s.

I can remember driving from Louisiana to Kansas in 1969 when I found gasoline price of 24 cents a gallon. It was during a gasoline price war in Texarkana, Arkansas.

A ten gallon tank would cost only $2.40 at the time. Today that same ten gallons would cost close to $40.00.

In addition to the low gasoline prices, you could have your tires checked, oil and water checked and have your windshield cleaned.

Today there very few full service gasoline stations remaining in the United States. Now you have to pump the gas and clean your own windshield, not to mention checking to see if you are running low on any of the fluids required to keep a car running well.

No convenience store clerk is going to be able to help you with any automotive problems, since they have to stay behind the counter to work the cash register.

We are in another high gasoline price cycle, but this time it may be longer lived than most cycles. We are hearing in the news about gasoline going to five dollars before the end of the year.

The amazing thing is that consumers continue to buy the huge gas guzzling SUV’s knowing they will have to pay $70-$80 for a tank of gasoline. That same tank full in the 1950’s would cost less between about five dollars.

The price of a barrel of crude oil is at the highest since 2008, yet nobody in Washington seems inclined to do anything about it.

The state of Texas is even considering raising the speed limit to 85 MPH on the interstates. A tank of gas won’t last long driving that fast.

We hear the same old rhetoric coming out of Washington about using the millions of gallons stored in storage tanks, but so far the government has done nothing to give relief to the consumer.

Unless something changes in Washington, this country will continue to be held hostage by foreign countries producing gasoline that is sent to the United States.

 

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